The Long Run

Nov 11, 2017–May 5, 2019

MoMA

Gerhard Richter. October 18, 1977. 1988. Fifteen paintings, oil on canvas, installation variable, from 13 3/4 x 15 1/2" (35 cm) to 6' 6 3/4" x 10' 6" (200 x 320 cm); shown: Youth Portrait, 28 1/2 x 24 1/2" (72.4 x 62 cm). The Sidney and Harriet Janis Collection, gift of Philip Johnson, and acquired through the Lilie P. Bliss Bequest (all by exchange); Enid A. Haupt Fund; Nina and Gordon Bunshaft Bequest Fund; and gift of Emily Rauh Pulitzer. © 2019 Gerhard Richter
  • MoMA, Floor 4

Innovation in art is often characterized as a singular event—a bolt of lightning that strikes once and forever changes what follows. The Long Run provides another view: by chronicling the continued experimentation of artists long after their breakthrough moments, it suggests that invention results from sustained critical thinking, persistent observation, and countless hours in the studio. Each work in this presentation exemplifies an artist’s distinct evolution. For some, this results from continually testing the boundaries of a given medium, for others it reflects the pressures of social, economic, and political circumstances. Often, it is a combination of both.

The latest iteration of The Long Run includes monographic galleries and rooms that bring together artists across a broad range of backgrounds and approaches. All the artists in this presentation—drawn entirely from MoMA’s collection—are united by a ceaseless desire to make meaningful work, year after year, across decades. They include Louise Bourgeois, Fischli/Weiss, Isa Genzken, Philip Guston, David Hammons, Joan Jonas, On Kawara, Agnes Martin, Joan Mitchell, Gerhard Richter, and many others.

Organized by Paulina Pobocha, Associate Curator, and Cara Manes, Associate Curator, with Jenny Harris, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Painting and Sculpture.

  • View the livestream from Artists and The Long Run

Leadership support for the exhibition is provided by the Kate W. Cassidy Foundation.

Major support is provided by Denise Littlefield Sobel.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

MoMA Audio is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.

Publications

  • 43 pages
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Events

Artists

Installation images

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